Lynne Sachs to present new film Tip of My Tongue at Light Moves Like Sound Waves screening

We previously had the pleasure of reviewing The Tip of My Tongue. You can find the review by Katie Grimes here. We were also able to host a Twitter chat with Denah Johnston and Lynne Sachs, moderated by Barabara Ann O’Leary, last fall, which can be found here.

San Francisco Cinematheque presents Light Moves Like Sound Waves: Lynne Sachs & Stephen Vitiello, Two Evenings with Lynne Sachs and Stephen Vitiello: Nov. 3 & 4, 2017.

Light Moves Like Sound Waves is a two-part screening series documenting the five-year collaborative relationship between filmmaker Lynne Sachs and sound artist Stephen Vitiello. “In collaborating on the soundtracks for my films, Stephen somehow recognizes the interior sounds of objects and releases them for us to hear. Together his music and his sound designs push audiences toward a new way of experiencing cinema,” said Lynne Sachs. This two-part series is presented at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on Nov. 3 and the Center for New Music on Nov. 4. Lynne Sachs and Stephen Vitiello will be in person at both screenings.

 

Still from Tip of My Tongue.

Still from Tip of My Tongue.

Program 1: Friday, Nov. 3 at 7:30 pm
SF Cinematheque at Yerba Buena Center
701 Mission Street at Third St

You can purchase advance tickets here.

Tip of My Tongue (2017). 80 minutes. Directed by Lynne Sachs.

You can watch the trailer here 

“In three decades of filmmaking, Lynne Sachs has created an amazingly sensitive and expansive body of work which ranges from personal film lyricism to complex and considered essay films on family legacies, engaged acts of political resistance, and cross-cultural communication. In her work, individual experiences and mindful reflection sit in graceful relation to global events and the magnitude of world histories. Created on the occasion of her fiftieth birthday, Sachs’ Tip of My Tongue (2017) opens space for intimate reflection as it convenes a coterie of the filmmaker’s New York City peers for intimate personal musings on aging, growth, and life on earth during the last five decades. Through a gentle collage of sounds, voices, lushly rendered cinematography, and evocative archival footage, Tip of My Tongue forms a dreamscape of conversation and confession as it models interpersonal connection and listening warmth as bolster against the ever darkening days.” —Steve Polta, Director SF Cinematheque

Program 2: Saturday, Nov. 4 at 7:00 pm
SF Cinematheque at Center for New Music
55 Taylor Street 

You can purchase advance tickets here.

Sound Cues from Wings – Two Sachs-Vitiello Collaborations and Sound Piece by Vitiello

In his recorded works, installations and live performances, sound artist Stephen Vitiello creates sonic works which explore space, ambiance and locative sound, presenting rich and minimal ephemeralities suggestive of atmosphere, weather, and luminance. Frequently collaborating closely with visual artists such as Nam June Paik, Tony Oursler, and Dara Birnbaum, Vitiello has worked with filmmaker Lynne Sachs for five years. “According to my hard drive, I began creating soundtracks for Lynne Sachs in 2012,” Vitiello said. “It feels like it could easily be longer, just in terms of the comfort of speaking about the role sound can take in Lynne’s works and finding a collaborative balance that gives me a great deal of freedom but also the interest to listen to valued feedback along the way. Film-to-film, I’ve truly enjoyed our working partnership.”

The program centers on performance works by Vitiello including Taking Sound Cues from Wings and From The Fish House.

Films to screen at the event include:

  • Drift and Bough (2014, Lynne Sachs): A Central Park snowscape and a stark midtown pastorale in which life and hope assert in the face of mid-winter blues.
  • Every Fold Matters (2014–2017, excerpt from live performance co-directed by Lynne Sachs & Lizzie Olesker with original music by Stephen Vitiello) Looks at the charged, intimate space of a crossroads of a Brooklyn community—the neighborhood laundromat.

You can visit the film’s Facebook events for Part 1 and Part 2, and can visit Lynne’s website for more information.

 

 

 

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